Rebecca Adamson

Bio:

Rebecca Adamson, an Indigenous economist, is founder and president of First Peoples Worldwide, the first US-based global Indigenous Peoples NGO, which makes grants and provides technical assistance and advocacy directly to Indigenous-led development projects. Ms. Adamson has worked directly with grassroots tribal communities, both domestically and internationally, as an advocate of local tribal issues since 1970. She established the premiere US development institute, First Nations Development Institute, in 1980, and in 1997 she founded First Peoples Worldwide. Ms. Adamson's work established the first microenterprise loan fund in the United States; the first tribal investment model; and a national movement for reservation land reform. Her work established a new field of culturally appropriate, values-driven development, which led to legislation that established new standards of accountability regarding federal trust responsibility for Native Americans. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Bay and Paul Foundations and the Calvert Social Investment Fund. As a trustee of Calvert, Rebecca partnered with the Fund to create the first Indigenous Peoples' rights investment screen in 1999, and led the creation of the Indigenous Rights Risk Report, the first quantitative assessment of corporate risk exposure to Indigenous Peoples' rights, in 2014. In 2015 she established three Shareholder Advocacy Leadership Training Centers located in Guatemala, Mexico, and Canada as a new strategy for Indigenous leaders in addressing extractive industry on Indigenous territories. She is an advisor to the U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Multi-Stakeholder Group. She holds a Master in Science in Economic Development from Southern New Hampshire University (formerly New Hampshire College) in Manchester, New Hampshire, where she has taught a graduate course on Indigenous Economics within the Community Economic Development Program, and a Doctor in Humane Letters degree from Dartmouth College.